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Arthritis and Foot Pain
Athlete’s Foot
Blisters
Bunions
Corns and Calluses
Creams
Diabetes
Emollients
Hammer Toes
Heel and Arch Pain
Nail Problems
Neuroma
Pes Planus
Poor Circulation
Severs Disease
Toe Devices
Warts

 
Corns and Calluses
Corns and calluses are thickened layers of skin caused by repeated pressure or friction.

Causes, Incidence, and Risk Factors

Corns and calluses are caused by pressure or friction on skin. A corn is thickened skin on the top or side of a toe, usually from shoes that do not fit properly. A callus is thickened skin on your hands or the soles of your feet.

The thickening of the skin is a protective reaction. For example, farmers and rowers get callused hands that prevent them from getting painful blisters. People with bunions often develop a callus over the bunion because it rubs against the shoe.

Neither corns nor calluses are serious conditions.

Symptoms

· Skin is thick and hardened.
· Skin may be flaky and dry.
· Hardened, thick skin areas are found on hands, feet, or other areas that may be rubbed or pressed.
· Signs and tests.

Your health care provider will make the diagnosis after observing the skin. In most cases tests are not necessary.

If an infection or ulcer occurs in an area of a callus or corn, unhealthy tissue may need to be removed by a chiropodist and treatment with antibiotics may be necessary.

Calluses often reflect undue pressure placed on the skin because of an underlying problem such as bunions. Proper treatment of any underlying condition should prevent the calluses from returning.