Get back to not thinking about your feet.
Arthritis and Foot Pain
Athlete’s Foot
Blisters
Bunions
Compression Hosiery
Corns and Calluses
Diabetes
Hammer Toes
Heel and Arch Pain
Nail Problems
Neuroma
Pes Planus
Poor Circulation
Severs Disease
Toe Devices
Warts

 
Blisters
A blister may form when the skin has been damaged by friction or rubbing, heat, cold or chemical exposure. Fluid collects between the epidermis – the upper layer of the skin – and the layers below. This fluid cushions the tissue underneath, protecting it from further damage and allowing it to heal.

Intense rubbing can cause a blister, as can any friction on the skin if continued long enough. This kind of blister is most common after walking long distances or wearing a new pair of shoes. Less aggressive rubbing over long periods of time may cause calluses to form rather than a blister. Both blisters and calluses can lead to more serious complications, such as foot ulceration and infection.

Blisters on the feet can be prevented by wearing comfortable, well-fitting shoes and clean socks. Inherently ill-fitting or stiffer shoes, such as high heels and dress shoes, present a larger risk of blistering. Blisters are more likely to develop on skin that is moist, so socks that manage moisture or frequent sock changes will aid those with particularly sweaty feet. While exercising or playing sports, special sports socks can help keep feet drier and reduce the chance of blisters. Before going for a long walk, it is also important to ensure that shoes or hiking boots have been properly broken in.